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Do I have Teen Depression?

Mental Illness  affects people of all walks and stages of life. This, of course, includes teenagers. Do you think you might have depression? Let’s see if we can shed some light for you.
First of all, clinical depression isn’t contagious.

teen depression

Do I have Teen Depression?

It’s not a stupid question so don’t feel bad. There are no depression bacteria or viruses, and you can’t catch it by being around someone else who has it. The causes of depression aren’t easy to pinpoint, though; life experiences like stress and trauma, as well as genetics, are some important risk factors that may predispose you to developing depression, but it doesn’t mean you definitely will develop it.

Parents concern

Parents concerns what wrong with my child? 

That said, it’s important to know that having depression does not make you weak. It is a mental illness, yes, but you would never say someone is weak for developing diabetes, right? The same is true for depression. As the name suggests, intense, prolonged sadness is a huge part of the experience of someone with depression. But it’s not the only part.

Do I have teen depression

Some teenagers report emotional numbness; they don’t enjoy the things they used to, and they’re just floating by from day to day.
People with depression find it hard to have positive thoughts. Motivation goes down the drain, and negativity takes its place. That affects your sleep, appetite, schoolwork, and even your social life.

Signs of  despair:

It is important to know lack of sleep is a sign that your child is struggling. As a matter of fact, depression different for everyone and self-diagnosis should be avoided, it is never a great idea. Still, you should look out for these signs and seek the help you need.

Teen Depression signs & symptoms:

Maybe you have some of the above symptoms. Your family might say it’s just a phase you’re going through, that you’ll grow out of it. They might even scold you for it. If you do have depression, though, it’s not just a phase. The best way to get over a depressive episode is to seek treatment.

Depression has to be diagnosed by a mental health professional like a psychiatrist. Yes, I know, you might not like the idea of getting your head shrunk. But guess what? Even mentally healthy people can benefit from therapy. Once the mental health professional determines you have depression, they’ll set up a plan specifically for you, to help you get better. You’ll have regular sessions with them and address the parts of your life that make it hard for you to be happy and healthy.

If they think you need it, they’ll suggest medications called antidepressants that help to bring balance to your brain and regain control of your life and your thoughts.
If you’re a parent reading this, please keep an open mind and listening ear. Be willing to help in any way you can and help to create a healthy home environment for your teen.
Depression is rough, but we can fight it and win if we work together!